endjin blogs

Think Smarter

Hedy, Not Peck

by Matthew Adams

Welcome to the Hedy Lamarr (inventor of Frequency Hopping) version of the metaphor. Avoid Achieve You can read the rest of the post back here.


Endjin spend a lot of time working with start ups and businesses who are pivoting into new product areas. They are usually operating under fierce resource constraints, and this has an impact on the way in which they can approach their development program. We’ve evolved a principles-based approach to the new product development process which […]

Category: Agile 1 Comment

Extending Endjin.Retry with custom Retry Policies

by Howard van Rooijen

Someone tweeted @endjin this week to ask if we were still supporting our Endjin.Retry framework; they asked because they were worried it had been abandoned because it had only had 6 minor commits in 2014. I replied to confirm that we have not abandoned this project in the slightest, in fact it’s one of our […]

Category: OSS 1 Comment

February 2015 Browser Share

by Matthew Adams

As endjin.com gets a few tens of thousands of users a month, who tend to be focussed in the general segment of ‘Microsoft Platform Developers, CIOs and CTOs”, and tend to arrive via a Google search, we have (more out of interest than anything else) been keeping tabs on browser share. Starting this month, I’m […]

Category: Uncategorized

When faced with the huge number of technologies and services that are now shipping under the Azure banner, it can be pretty daunting. How do you identify the choices that will be right for your solution? And are you making the right price/performance trade-offs? And what is the difference between a web role and a […]


Endjin.Licensing – Part 5: Real world usage patterns

by Howard van Rooijen

We’ve open sourced a lightweight licensing framework we’ve been using internally over the last couple of years. In a 5 part series I’m covering the motivation behind building it, how you can use it, how you can extend it for your own scenarios and how you could use it in a real world situation: Part […]

Category: OSS

We’ve open sourced a lightweight licensing framework we’ve been using internally over the last couple of years. In a 5 part series I’m covering the motivation behind building it, how you can use it, how you can extend it for your own scenarios and how you could use it in a real world situation: Part […]

Category: OSS 1 Comment

We’ve open sourced a lightweight licensing framework we’ve been using internally over the last couple of years. In a 5 part series I’m covering the motivation behind building it, how you can use it, how you can extend it for your own scenarios and how you could use it in a real world situation: Part […]

Category: OSS 2 Comments

We’ve open sourced a lightweight licensing framework we’ve been using internally over the last couple of years. In a 5 part series I’m covering the motivation behind building it, how you can use it, how you can extend it for your own scenarios and how you could use it in a real world situation: Part […]

Category: OSS 3 Comments

We’ve open sourced a lightweight licensing framework we’ve been using internally over the last couple of years. In a 5 part series I’m covering the motivation behind building it, how you can use it, how you can extend it for your own scenarios and how you could use it in a real world situation: Part […]

Category: OSS 4 Comments

This blog is an addendum to Richard’s recent post about using Azure Automation to run VMs during office hours only. As Richard explains, you can use Azure Automation to create runbooks which contain PowerShell Workflows with the functionality you want to implement (e.g. starting and stopping a virtual machine or cloud service), and link those […]


We read an awful lot in the press about startups and their immense valuations. Here’s a recent post from Business Insider about the 9 startups that are going to be valued at more than $10bn in 2015. We have a lot of conversations with early stage startups who are about to take their first or […]


Diagnostic logging with Azure SDK 2.5

by Richard Kerslake

Azure SDK 2.5 was announced on November 12th 2014.  Among other changes, the SDK includes Azure Diagnostics Client Library 1.3, which has significant and breaking changes since previous versions (Azure SDK 2.4 and previous versions used Diagnostics 1.0). One of the primary reasons for the change is to move from a plugin model to an […]


Send Data into Azure Event Hubs using Web Api’s HttpClient

by Howard van Rooijen

We’ve recently been working on an Internet of Things (IoT) Proof of Concept which involved sending device telemetry into Azure to be shaped, enriched, materialized into different data formats and then computationally processed, before being ingested into PowerBI. As another part of the Proof of Concept was to design and manufacture the actual device, we […]


This blog describes two tools I used last year to take some of the work out of a repetitive refactor. The tools were Visual Studio’s Find tool, with a regex, and Resharper’s Search by Pattern feature – I compare my experiences with the two here. The refactor – adding a class to certain html elements […]


This blog explains how you can use the Git client SmartGit to follow the GitFlow model, which Howard described in his series a step by Step Guide to using GitFlow with TeamCity. GitFlow GitFlow specifies a standard branch structure and workflow for moving changes between branches, which standardise the way a team uses Git, and […]


January 2015 Browser Share

by Matthew Adams

As endjin.com gets a few tens of thousands of users a month, who tend to be focussed in the general segment of ‘Microsoft Platform Developers, CIOs and CTOs”, and tend to arrive via a Google search, we have (more out of interest than anything else) been keeping tabs on browser share. Starting this month, I’m […]

Category: Uncategorized

TPL Dataflow by Example code samples for LINQPad

by Howard van Rooijen

Reactive Programming and in particular Task Parallel Library Dataflow has been on my radar for a number of years after reading  Stephen Toub’s “Introduction to TPL Dataflow” whitepaper and watching his Channel9 videos (TPL Dataflow Tour, Inside TPL Dataflow). Unfortunately all of my research time of late has been absorbed trying to keep up with […]


Using Azure Automation to run VMs during office hours only

by Richard Kerslake

Endjin have been using Microsoft Azure to host our ALM infrastructure for some time. This includes TeamCity, YouTrack and UpSource (all from JetBrains). TeamCity and YouTrack are running on an A2 instance each (£67.27). UpSource is running on an A3 instance (£134.54). Our current total cost is £269.08 per month (as of Jan 2015). We’d […]


Elasticsearch gotchas and tips – part 2

by Richard Kerslake

It has been some time since my last post giving tips on the hardware and software requirements for installing and running Elasticsearch on Azure. This post is a further series of gotchas and tips that I’ve picked up on during my journey using Elasticsearch. It is split into 3 broad categories covering various configuration items, […]


1 2 3 9